Your Resident Nerd

lambdageneration:

mat2modblog:

Err woops!
space-pics:

You can never have enough Earthrise (Apollo 10)http://space-pics.tumblr.com/

You really can’t

space-pics:

You can never have enough Earthrise (Apollo 10)
http://space-pics.tumblr.com/

You really can’t

space-pics:

Elliot & Gordon & Neil & Gushttp://space-pics.tumblr.com/

Just a couple of astronauts not giving a fuck

space-pics:

Elliot & Gordon & Neil & Gus
http://space-pics.tumblr.com/

Just a couple of astronauts not giving a fuck

space-pics:

Enterprise - first flight - Aug. 12, 1977http://space-pics.tumblr.com/

Ironic, isn’t it? The Enterprise (from Star Trek) explored the final frontiers of space, but this Enterprise never did more than glide tests off of the backs of 747s.

space-pics:

Enterprise - first flight - Aug. 12, 1977
http://space-pics.tumblr.com/

Ironic, isn’t it? The Enterprise (from Star Trek) explored the final frontiers of space, but this Enterprise never did more than glide tests off of the backs of 747s.

space-pics:

Quality item.http://space-pics.tumblr.com/

I hate to burst your bubble, but that’s actually Buzz Aldrin…

space-pics:

Quality item.
http://space-pics.tumblr.com/

I hate to burst your bubble, but that’s actually Buzz Aldrin…

space-pics:

Moscow’s secret Moon planhttp://space-pics.tumblr.com/

'Murica!
(One of the few times I’m actually willing to say that)

space-pics:

Moscow’s secret Moon plan
http://space-pics.tumblr.com/

'Murica!

(One of the few times I’m actually willing to say that)

Wut

(via worldlywalrus)

space-pics:

Star Gazers. Kevin Hu. [2048 × 1365]http://space-pics.tumblr.com/

The lone observers

space-pics:

Star Gazers. Kevin Hu. [2048 × 1365]

http://space-pics.tumblr.com/

The lone observers

wildcat2030:

Is this the most extraordinary human brain ever seen?
ONCE you know what it is, this apparently innocuous picture of a blob assumes a terrible gravity. It is an adult human brain that is entirely smooth – free of the ridges and folds so characteristic of our species’ most complex organ. We can only imagine what life was like for this person. He or she was a resident of what is now North Texas State Hospital, a mental health facility, and died there in 1970, but that’s all we know. While the jar containing the brain is labelled with a reference number, the microfilm containing the patient’s medical records has been lost. Photographer Adam Voorhes spent a year trying to track down more information about this and nearly 100 other human brains held in a collection at the University of Texas, Austin, to no avail. The label on the jar states that the patient had agyria – a lack of gyri and sulci, the ridges and folds formed by the normally wrinkled cerebral cortex. This rare condition, also known as lissencephaly, often leads to death before the age of 10. It can cause muscle spasms, seizures and, as it vastly reduces the surface area of this key part of the brain, a range of learning difficulties. (via Is this the most extraordinary human brain ever seen? - life - 17 September 2013 - New Scientist)

Creepy

wildcat2030:

Is this the most extraordinary human brain ever seen?

ONCE you know what it is, this apparently innocuous picture of a blob assumes a terrible gravity. It is an adult human brain that is entirely smooth – free of the ridges and folds so characteristic of our species’ most complex organ. We can only imagine what life was like for this person. He or she was a resident of what is now North Texas State Hospital, a mental health facility, and died there in 1970, but that’s all we know. While the jar containing the brain is labelled with a reference number, the microfilm containing the patient’s medical records has been lost. Photographer Adam Voorhes spent a year trying to track down more information about this and nearly 100 other human brains held in a collection at the University of Texas, Austin, to no avail. The label on the jar states that the patient had agyria – a lack of gyri and sulci, the ridges and folds formed by the normally wrinkled cerebral cortex. This rare condition, also known as lissencephaly, often leads to death before the age of 10. It can cause muscle spasms, seizures and, as it vastly reduces the surface area of this key part of the brain, a range of learning difficulties. (via Is this the most extraordinary human brain ever seen? - life - 17 September 2013 - New Scientist)

Creepy

I feel like I’m straying too far from my astronomy roots. In an attempt to make up for it, here is a photograph of the Saturnian moon Mimas. I wonder how that massive crater was formed, especially since whatever did it didn’t fragment the whole moon!